Monthly Archives: January 2018

28 posts

S05 Episode 11: From Desperadoes to Disciples—The Unlikely Advantage of Addiction (Nate Larkin, Samson Society)

Download “Beyond Accountability,” a free eBook written by Nate Larkin from Samson Society. Visit http://discipleship.org/accountability to get your free copy of this eBook in PDF, Mobi and ePub formats.

 

The following audio comes from the National Disciple Making Forum by Discipleship.org. The theme for this year was “Disciple Maker,” and two organizations—Radical Mentoring and Samson Society—hosted a track called “Men’s Discipleship.” That’s where we recorded the audio for today’s episode.

 

Connect with Discipleship.org:

https://www.facebook.com/discipleshipforum

 

Relevant Links:

Samson Society: http://samsonsociety.org/

Radical Mentoring: https://radicalmentoring.com/

Become a Level 5 Disciple Maker

Discipleship.org and Exponential pulled together top national disciple making leaders to map out 5 levels of disciple making. Our model shows people moving from conversion where a person starts as a spiritual infant (level 1) on up through levels 2 and 3 to reach level 4, a personal disciple maker. And then, at level 5, a leader who makes disciple makers. The following diagram illustrates the process.

The effective utilization of this process is the key to a disciple making strategy. And a disciple making strategy is the key to becoming a disciple making and multiplying church. It drives mission, service, and sanctification. It is hard to overstate the importance of disciple making. That is why we are creating tools to help you as a disciple maker.

Discipleship.org and Exponential have collaborated to produce an online assessment for individuals to use so they can determine their objective level (1 through 5) as a personal disciple maker (click here to take the FREE assessment). And I collaborated with Greg Wiens to produce a free eBook on the process (Bobby Harrington and Greg Wiens, Becoming a Disciple Maker: The Pursuit of Level 5 Disciple Making (click here to download the book for FREE). These two tools are very important for your development, but so is personal training.

There will be two personal training opportunities this year. At the end of February, those attending the Exponential East conference in Orlando can join national disciple making leaders like Jim Putman, Bill Hull, David Clayton and others in a teaching/workshop on the five levels (click here). And October 25-26th, those attending the National Disciple Making Forum in Nashville can join an even larger array of national disciple making leaders from training resources (click here). We also hope to release digital training material on becoming a level 5 disciple maker, so keep an eye on Discipleship.org for information on the release of this material by the summer.

For more information, contact info@discipleship.org.

Written by Bobby Harrington


Bobby Harrington is the Executive Director of Discipleship.org, a national platform, conference, and ministry that advocates for Jesus’ style of disciple making. He is the founding and lead pastor of Harpeth Christian Church (by the Harpeth River, just outside of Nashville, TN). He has a Doctor of Ministry degree in consulting and has spent years as a coach to church planters and senior pastors. He is the author of several books on discipleship, including DiscipleShift (with Jim Putman and Robert Coleman) and The Disciple Maker’s Handbook (with Josh Patrick).

The Top Book Recommendations of 12 Disciple Making Leaders

Discipleship.org asked the leaders of 12 Disciple Making ministries that partner with us to share their top 2 book recommendations. We told everyone to assume the recommendations of two classics: The Master Plan of Evangelism, by Robert Coleman and The Cost of Discipleship, by Dietrich Bonhoeffer. We also encouraged each leader to only recommend only one of books that they have written.

Here are top two recommendations from each leader (and their organization).

Bill Hull (Bonhoeffer Project)

  1. Conversion and Discipleship, Bill Hull
  2. Divine Conspiracy, Dallas Willard

Jim Putman (Relational Discipleship Network)

  1. Real-Life Discipleship Training Manual, Jim Putman, Bill Krause, Avery Willis, and Brandon Guindon
  2. Four Chair Discipling, Dann Spader

Daniel Im (LifeWay)

  1. No Silver Bullets, Daniel Im
  2. The Disciple Makers Handbook, Bobby Harrington and Josh Patrick.

Greg Ogden (Global Discipleship Initiative)

  1. Transforming Discipleship: Making Disciples A Few at a Time, Ogden
  2. The Disciple Making Pastor, Bill Hull

Dann Spader (Sonlife Ministries)

  1. Four Chair Discipling, Dann Spader
  2. Bold Moves, Craig Etheridge

Robby Gallaty (Replicate Ministries)

  1. Rediscovering Discipleship, Robby Gallaty
  2. The Disciple Making Pastor, Bill Hull

Regi Campbell (Radical Mentoring)

  1. Mentor like Jesus, Regi Campbell
  2. Bo’s Café, John Lynch, Bill Thrall and Bruce McNicol

Justin Gravitt (Navigator Church Ministries)

  1. Ways of the Alongsider, Bill Mowry
  2. High Quest: Women of Distinction, Navigators

Monte Starkes (Life on Life Ministries)

  1. Transforming Discipleship: Making Disciples A Few at a Time, Greg Ogden
  2. The Training of the Twelve, A. B. Bruce

Kennon Vaughan (Downline Ministries)

  1. The Training of the Twelve, A. B. Bruce
  2. Trellis and the Vine, Colin Marshall and Tony Payne

Dave Buehring (Lionshare)

  1. The Discipleship Journey, Dave Buehring
  2. The Complete Book of Discipleship, Bill Hull

Craig Etheredge (discipleFIRST)

  1. Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus, Ann Spangler and Lois Tverberg
  2. Four Chair Discipling, Dann Spader

The four books that received more than one recommendation are The Disciple Making Pastor by Bill Hull, Four Chair Discipling, by Dann Spader, Transforming Discipleship: Making Disciples A Few at a Time, by Greg Ogden, and The Training of the Twelve, by A. B. Bruce. We recommend all of the books we have listed to our readers.

Our National Disciple Making Forum, October 25-26th will feature ten of the authors of these recommended books. Our theme for 2018 is Discipling Relationships. We hope you will be able to join us.

Written by Bobby Harrington


Bobby Harrington is the Executive Director of Discipleship.org, a national platform, conference, and ministry that advocates for Jesus’ style of disciple making. He is the founding and lead pastor of Harpeth Christian Church (by the Harpeth River, just outside of Nashville, TN). He has a Doctor of Ministry degree in consulting and has spent years as a coach to church planters and senior pastors. He is the author of several books on discipleship, including DiscipleShift (with Jim Putman and Robert Coleman) and The Disciple Maker’s Handbook (with Josh Patrick).

Photo by João Silas on Unsplash

Transformation and Unhurriedness

The Slow Life is built on a commitment to unhurriedness and the practices of silence, Sabbath, and hospitality, which allow us to come to God and be renewed by God. Unhurriedness is perhaps harder to nail down, less concrete than the other practices, and yet The Slow Life begins with a commitment to unhurriedness.

The essence of unhurriedness is living at a speed at which you can be fully present, without undue regret over the past nor anxiety about the future, with enough margin to be fully aware and present with who Jesus is and what he is doing around you. It is a posture of heart and mind which Alan Fadling calls “walking at Jesus’ pace of grace.”[1] It means creating space for your soul to deal with and release the anxieties that naturally build up within us, and it’s at the heart of Jesus’ practical picture of life in the Kingdom of God.[2] And it is a posture which takes time and practice to cultivate.

Unhurriedness is different than a mere lack of busyness. You can have a lot to get done yet have a heart posture of unhurriedness in the midst of it. And while you can be busy without being hurried, you can have little to do and yet be hurried in the midst of it. At the same time, unhurriedness generally requires discipline which keeps us from being continually busy or over-busy, and that will often mean adjusting our schedules, embracing our limits, and saying “no” to certain commitments. Thus, while unhurriedness is a commitment to a posture of heart and mind, it will generally entail concrete changes to our daily, weekly, and yearly schedule.

How does this posture of unhurriedness fuel spiritual life in God? Well, imagine a walk in the woods. You’re on a three-mile loop and you’re walking for time, trying to get back to the trailhead in half an hour. You’re focused on quick, long strides and maintaining a consistent pace. Tree roots across the path are hurdles to be jumped, branches are obstacles to be avoided. You are focused on your quickened breathing and your heartbeat.

Now imagine taking the same walk, but with three hours to spare. You set an entirely different pace, much slower. Would your experience be different? From my own experience on such walks, I’m amazed at how much I miss when moving at a fast pace. When I slow down, the tree roots cease to be obstacles to be avoided and become instead works of art to be appreciated. At a certain pace, I am free to become aware of the way the branches and leaves move in the wind. I see the light diffracting through the canopy, filtering down to the forest floor. The point is, our experience of life is different when we are moving at different speeds. The brain functions differently when we are focused on getting somewhere or getting something done versus on being present and aware of where we are.

Now, of course not all hours or days or even weeks can be like that second walk, but can many or even most of them? Or, can at least a part of each day be like that second walk? Because it’s precisely on that walk that we become open to God in a different way. When we are not focused on just getting something down or getting there, we can hear the voice of God with more sensitive ears. Indeed, when we move at a pace in which our brain can focus on listening rather than on task, our hearts have space to flower outward.

This is precisely the point of The Slow Life and of a commitment to unhurriedness: it allows us to see and hear Who God is and what God is speaking. If you don’t have space to see or hear Who God is, there is little catalyst for transformation. There is no transformation without encounter and there is generally little encounter if space is not made to hold the encounter. Thus, we need to move at a pace conducive to encounter. This does not mean God cannot break through to us in all sorts of times or places. It’s just a lot easier to hear and focus on the radio when you’re sitting in a parked car than it is at 80 miles an hour weaving through traffic. The same dynamic applies in our spiritual lives.

Written by Brandon Cook


Brandon Cook is the lead pastor at Long Beach Christian Fellowship and a co-founder of The Bonhoeffer Project. Originally from Birmingham, Alabama, he studied at Wheaton College (IL), Jerusalem University College, Brandeis University, and The Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. He worked as a professional storyteller before joining a transformational training organization and moving to SoCal in 2006, becoming a pastor three years later. Over the course of five years of pastoring, he became convinced that his work—and the work of the church—is to become fully committed to discipleship and making disciple-makers. The Bonhoeffer Project is for him a quest to live into the question “How are people transformed to live and love like Jesus?”


NOTES

[1] See Alan Fadling, The Unhurried Leader, IVP Books, 2017. See also The Unhurried Life by Alan Fadling, IVP Books, 2013.

[2] See the Sermon on the Mount, Matthew 5-7, especially Matthew 6:26ff

Photo by Jon Flobrant on Unsplash

S05 Episode 10: Making Disciples for a Lifetime – David Fedele of discipleFIRST

Download “Invest in a Few,” a free eBook written by Craig Etheredge, the Founder and President of discipleFIRST. Visit http://discipleship.org/disciplefirst to get your free copy of this eBook in PDF, Mobi and ePub formats.

 

The following audio comes from the National Disciple Making Forum by Discipleship.org. The theme for this year was “Disciple Maker,” and an organization called discipleFIRST hosted a track called “Invest in a Few: How to Raise Up Reproducing Disciple Makers.” That’s where audio for today’s episode was recorded.

 

Connect with Discipleship.org:

https://www.facebook.com/discipleshipforum

 

Connect with discipleFIRST:

https://disciplefirst.com/

https://www.facebook.com/disciplefirst

https://www.instagram.com/disciple1st/